ArtistsOpenHouses

Super…what?

Suparest…

Suparest were an English furniture manufacturer back in the 1930’s. They made some interesting pieces usually with some form of bentwood in the design. I found one of their chairs and upholstered it for a friend a few years ago – see previous blog ‘Silk stockings & Bed Springs’.  Last summer, I came across another rather special one…

As you can see it was in a bit of a sad state, covered in grim red vinyl and the beautiful wood had been covered up with brown paint. However, its potential was singing to me so I bought it. You know I like a challenge…

Bit of background

This chair was made around 1930 and is a great example of Art Deco furniture.  Its two bow-shaped, beech timbers are steam bent all the way round to form the legs as well as the arms and backrest – a very clever design. The two sides are connected by crossbars and the upholstered spring unit is hung on the frame.

Back to the frame

I stripped back the upholstery and took the frame to be dipped to remove the brown paint.  Even naked it looked gorgeous, so we included it in our ‘Beneath The Surface’ exhibition to illustrate the beauty of the inside of chairs.

The rebuild

The original spring unit was beautiful but quite saggy so I sent it off to Wade Springs in Nottingham where they cleverly ‘reverse engineered’ me a new one! Then I set about rebuilding it. As 90% of the upholstery is attached to the metal spring unit, each layer has to be hand sewn into place… At this point I discovered that new spring units are quite sharp – youch!

Then onto the padding, first the coir, then a layer of rubberised hair which was sewn to the spring unit again (forgot to take a photo of that stage!) and then a layer of cotton wool felt.

The fabric

Any chair with an inverted curve needs a fabric that has some stretch to it, so a wool felt seemed like the perfect option. This fabric is a hard wearing wool felt by Camira that comes in great range of colours. I’ve used it to create a hand tailored cover – basically you cut and fit fabric together with pins, take it back off the chair frame, sew it together and then fit it back on. It may sound simple, but believe me its not…

This top fabric layer and the back all had to be sewn in place again.

And here she is all finished! An unusual Art Deco chair fully restored to her former glory in some smart contemporary fabric. This chair was sold to some lovely people this May at Emily Boo & Guests Open House as part of the Brighton Artists Open Houses 

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Sit back and dream of summer…

Making connections

Last May, at the one of the Brighton Artist Open Houses, I met Lizzie Hillier from Sussex based textile design company called Woven Oak. I loved their fabrics and was keen to see if we could bring our skills together to create a beautiful chair.

A good find

Then a few months ago, I found this rather special 1930’s reclining chair at Shabitat in Brighton. Its upholstery was in serious need of some attention but its shape and woodwork were lovely. The chair also reclines, so while sitting you can slide the seat forward and the back tilts. Perfect for an afternoon nap!

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Floor sweepings and tigers

Stripping it back revealed the original fabric (swirly brown and carpet-like) and ye olde upholstery practice of sweeping the floor and emptying the contents of the dustpan into the chair stuffing! Mmmmm lovely. However, I quite like the plywood from the back with all its old stamps. Easy tiger…


 
 The seat was a hand stitched sprung cushion that would have been beautifully made in its day but was falling apart! No wonder the seat was so lumpy.


With a newly sprung seat and sustainable materials to rebuild its upholstery, the chair was all ready for its final cover…

This is Woven Oak’s ‘Bloom’ fabric – such a beautiful print that really suited the age and style of the chair. Fabric and chair together have created rather a lovely place to sit back and dream of summer days…


If you’d like to know more about the wonderful process of creating a design using linocuts, you can read Katie Treggiden’s design blog where she interviews Lizzie from Woven Oak.

All dressed up with somewhere to go

This chair was sold to a lovely person at No. 44 Florence Road, Brighton part of the 2016 Artists Open Houses.