springupholstery

Super…what?

Suparest…

Suparest were an English furniture manufacturer back in the 1930’s. They made some interesting pieces usually with some form of bentwood in the design. I found one of their chairs and upholstered it for a friend a few years ago – see previous blog ‘Silk stockings & Bed Springs’.  Last summer, I came across another rather special one…

As you can see it was in a bit of a sad state, covered in grim red vinyl and the beautiful wood had been covered up with brown paint. However, its potential was singing to me so I bought it. You know I like a challenge…

Bit of background

This chair was made around 1930 and is a great example of Art Deco furniture.  Its two bow-shaped, beech timbers are steam bent all the way round to form the legs as well as the arms and backrest – a very clever design. The two sides are connected by crossbars and the upholstered spring unit is hung on the frame.

Back to the frame

I stripped back the upholstery and took the frame to be dipped to remove the brown paint.  Even naked it looked gorgeous, so we included it in our ‘Beneath The Surface’ exhibition to illustrate the beauty of the inside of chairs.

The rebuild

The original spring unit was beautiful but quite saggy so I sent it off to Wade Springs in Nottingham where they cleverly ‘reverse engineered’ me a new one! Then I set about rebuilding it. As 90% of the upholstery is attached to the metal spring unit, each layer has to be hand sewn into place… At this point I discovered that new spring units are quite sharp – youch!

Then onto the padding, first the coir, then a layer of rubberised hair which was sewn to the spring unit again (forgot to take a photo of that stage!) and then a layer of cotton wool felt.

The fabric

Any chair with an inverted curve needs a fabric that has some stretch to it, so a wool felt seemed like the perfect option. This fabric is a hard wearing wool felt by Camira that comes in great range of colours. I’ve used it to create a hand tailored cover – basically you cut and fit fabric together with pins, take it back off the chair frame, sew it together and then fit it back on. It may sound simple, but believe me its not…

This top fabric layer and the back all had to be sewn in place again.

And here she is all finished! An unusual Art Deco chair fully restored to her former glory in some smart contemporary fabric. This chair was sold to some lovely people this May at Emily Boo & Guests Open House as part of the Brighton Artists Open Houses 

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Photo by Crusoe Weston

Below the surface

Traditional upholstery is about so much more than the fabric that covers a chair. Underneath the surface there is layer upon layer of work to create, build and sustain the shape of the chair. All achieved mainly using these and a few simple tools… I know, I’d never make a hand model!

People are often surprised by the cost of traditional upholstery, so I thought it would be worth showing quite how much work goes into it…

The Arms
There are over 10 stages to build traditional arms – even more if they are sprung! Here are just a few…

The Back

This is going to be a buttoned back – which is why the edges are being built up first to create a well for the buttons… Rest in peace Princess Leia.

The Seat
And at least another 15 stages to build a sprung, stitched and stuffed seat. This one has an independent sprung edge for extra comfort…

And here it is, hand built and stitched – before its top cover. I often wish I could leave them in their underwear like this…

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So why bother?

So why bother with all that palaver, when you can just use foam and get the job done much more quickly? Here’s why…

Sustainability The materials used in this chair are all natural and biodegradable, apart from the metal springs and they can be recycled. Foam is an oil-based product and will sit in land fill for hundreds of years.
Longevity A chair built with traditional materials and methods will last a long, long time, literally decades beyond the life of a modern piece of furniture made with foam.
Tradition This is how these antique chairs would have been upholstered over 100 years ago. To retain the integrity and authenticity of an antique piece of furniture its important to use methods and materials in keeping with its origins.
Celebrate and keep British craft alive! These skills will die out if we don’t keep using, sharing and teaching them…

 

From the Outer Hebrides to East Sussex…

A while ago, some friends of friends asked me to reupholster their two seater sofa. They had bought it when they were first married about 20 years ago and it fitted perfectly in the front room of their cottage. It has been well loved over the years but needed some work.

Now, I don’t tend to upholster modern sofas, but this one had a bit of story. The family were off on their holidays to the Scottish Isles and wanted to buy the fabric while on the Isle of Harris – the home of Harris Tweed. They have family connections with that part of the world and liked the idea of buying it straight from source!

Here’s the well loved sofa, a little worn and patched, but a nice shape and with good strong bones underneath.

Sofa progress…

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new foam and webs

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Hard to see from the photos but there were lots of red, blue and yellow lines to line up!


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ready for outside back and arms to go on..


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seat done, just cushions to go…

 

The sofa is now installed safely back in the cottage, its really comfy again and all ready for its second life!

The bolt of fabric that was driven all the way from the Outer Hebrides to East Sussex was stamped with the orb mark of the Harris Tweed Authority. I added a little Harris Tweed label too…. You can find out more about the Isle of Harris and their famous Tweed.

Saving sofas from landfill

It was great to rescue this well loved piece of furniture, particularly as there are literally millions of sofas that end up in landfill. Every year, we throw away approximately 670,000 tonnes of furniture – this equates to 4.2 million discarded two seater sofas!  If you’d like to know how to avoid sending your sofa to landfill, check out seven ways to keep our sofas out of landfill. Only one of the suggestions is re-upholstery – honest!